Good Reads / Audible

 

A sound mind is in a sound body.

The proverb which is of Greek origin insists that the mind and body should be both healthy and sound. A healthy person can think normally and act instantly in any given situation. A sound body is a healthy body, free from diseases, ready to respond to any physical challenge life throws its way. A sound mind is a mind capable of good, positive and free thought. Just as Crossfit is defined as constantly varied movements across broad time and modal domains, reading that is constantly varied across many domains can enhance adaptivity, objectivity and free thought. No one can deny that the mind and body are ineradicably connected. A sound mind can function with a positive approach if it exists in a sound body.

Below are just a few suggested reads. Please feel free to suggest additions to this list.

 

Learning to breath Fire:

The absorbing, definitive account of CrossFit’s origins, its explosive grassroots growth, and its emergence as a global phenomenon. 

One of the most illuminating books ever on a sports subculture, Learning to Breathe Fire combines vivid sports writing with a thoughtful meditation on what it means to be human. In the book, veteran journalist J.C. Herz explains the science of maximum effort, why the modern gym fails an obese society, and the psychic rewards of ending up on the floor feeling as though you’re about to die.

Chasing Excellence:

“Ben’s ability to develop mental toughness and the approach he shares in Chasing Excellence is a game changer for athletes in any sport.”

Using the dramatic competition between the top contenders at the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Games® as a background, Ben explores the step-by-step process of achieving excellence and the unique set of positive character traits necessary for leveling up to world-class. The mindset and methodology that have produced some of the greatest athletes in the world’s most gruelling sport can work equally well for golfers, lawyers, artists, entrepreneurs—anyone who’s willing to commit totally to becoming better than the best.

 

How To Win Friends and Influence people:

There is strange inconsistency between the brassiness of the title and much of what is actually in this book.

View this title through todays skeptical lens, and you might miss it’s magic. This book is above all, a treatise of applying the unmatched combination of authentic empathy, strategic connection and generous leadership. To demonstrate the lasting relevancy of his tools, Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc., has reimagined his prescriptions and his advice for our difficult digital age. We may communicate today with different tools and with greater speed, but Carnegie’s advice on how to communicate, lead, and work efficiently remains priceless across the ages. A must read for any human being.

 

Grit: The power of passion and perseverance

In her instant, multi-month New York Times bestseller, Angela Duckworth shows anyone striving to succeed that the secret to outstanding achievement is not talent, but a special blend of passion and persistence she calls “grit.” “Inspiration for non-geniuses everywhere” (People).

The daughter of a scientist who frequently noted her lack of “genius,” Angela Duckworth is now a celebrated researcher and professor. It was her early eye-opening stints in teaching, business consulting, and neuroscience that led to her hypothesis about what really drives success: not genius, but a unique combination of passion and long-term perseverance.

 

The Fighters Mind:

A fascinating book, bursting at the seams with incredible stories and insight.

In his acclaimed national best seller, A Fighter’s Heart , Sam Sheridan took readers with him as he stepped through the ropes into the dangerous world of professional fighting. From a muay Thai bout in Bangkok to Rio, where he trained with jiu-jitsu royalty, to Iowa, where he matched up against the toughest in MMA, Sheridan threw himself into a quest to understand how and why we fight.

 

Mistakes Were Made (But not by me):

“Entertaining, illuminating and—when you recognize yourself in the stories it tells—mortifying.” —Wall Street Journal

Why is it so hard to say “I made a mistake”—and really believe it?
When we make mistakes, cling to outdated attitudes, or mistreat other people, we must calm the cognitive dissonance that jars our feelings of self-worth. And so, unconsciously, we create fictions that absolve us of responsibility, restoring our belief that we are smart, moral, and right—a belief that often keeps us on a course that is dumb, immoral, and wrong. Backed by years of research, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me) offers a fascinating explanation of self-justification—how it works, the damage it can cause, and how we can overcome it.

The Power of Moments:

The New York Times bestselling authors of Switch and Made to Stick explore why certain brief experiences can jolt us and elevate us and change us—and how we can learn to create such extraordinary moments in our life and work.

This book delves into some fascinating mysteries of experience: Why we tend to remember the best or worst moment of an experience, as well as the last moment, and forget the rest. Why “we feel most comfortable when things are certain, but we feel most alive when they’re not.” And why our most cherished memories are clustered into a brief period during our youth.

 

Mindset: The new psychology of success

Now updated with new research, the book that has changed millions of lives with its insights into the growth mindset.

After decades of research, world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., discovered a simple but groundbreaking idea: the power of mindset. In this brilliant book, she shows how success in school, work, sports, the arts, and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by how we think about our talents and abilities. People with a fixed mindset—those who believe that abilities are fixed—are less likely to flourish than those with a growth mindset—those who believe that abilities can be developed. Mindset reveals how great parents, teachers, managers, and athletes can put this idea to use to foster outstanding accomplishment.

 

Rich Dad Poor Dad:

The #1 Personal Finance book of all time… translated into dozens of languages and sold around the world.

Rich Dad Poor Dad is Robert’s story of growing up with two dads — his real father and the father of his best friend, his rich dad — and the ways in which both men shaped his thoughts about money and investing. The book explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to be rich and explains the difference between working for money and having your money work for you. 20 Years… 20/20 Hindsight. In many ways, the messages of Rich Dad Poor Dad, messages that were criticized and challenged two decades ago, are more meaningful, relevant and important today than they were 20 years ago. As always, readers can expect that Robert will be candid, insightful… and continue to rock more than a few boats in his retrospective. Will there be a few surprises? Count on it.

 

The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don’t Work and What to Do About It.

The E‑Myth Revisited by Michael Gerber is one of the five top-selling business books of all time, has been translated into 27 languages and is required reading in countless MBA programs. 

The Entrepreneurial Myth: 1: The myth that most people who start small businesses are entrepreneurs. 2: The fatal assumption that an individual who understands the technical work of a business can successfully run a business that does that technical work.

An instant classic, this revised and updated edition of the phenomenal bestseller dispels the myths about starting your own business. Small business consultant and author Michael E. Gerber, with sharp insight gained from years of experience, points out how common assumptions, expectations, and even technical expertise can get in the way of running a successful business.

Gerber walks you through the steps in the life of a business—from entrepreneurial infancy through adolescent growing pains to the mature entrepreneurial perspective: the guiding light of all businesses that succeed—and shows how to apply the lessons of franchising to any business, whether or not it is a franchise. Most importantly, Gerber draws the vital, often overlooked distinction between working on your business and working in your business.

 

The Subtle Art of not Giving a F*ck: 

*WARNING: STRONG LANGUAGE THAT MAY BE UNSUITED FOR KIDS OR YOUNG ADULTS*

#1 New York Times Bestseller with over 1 million copies sold.

For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. “F**k positivity,” Mark Manson says. “Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live with it.” In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is—a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

 

Thinking Fast and Slow:

Major New York Times bestseller. Winner of the National Academy of Science Best Book Award in 2012.  Globe and Mail Best Book of the Year 2011. The Economist’s 2011 Book of the Year. The Wall Street Journal’s Best Nonfiction Book of the Year 2011. 2013 Presidential Medal of Freedom Recipient.

In the international bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, the renowned psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. The impact of overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the profound effect of cognitive biases on everything from playing the stock market to planning our next vacation—each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems shape our judgments and decisions.

 

The Peter Principle:

“The Peter Principle has cosmic implications.”—New York Times. 

Back in 1969, Lawrence J. Peter created a cultural phenomenon with his brilliant, outrageous, hilarious, and all-too-true treatise on business and life, The Peter Principle—and his words and theories are as true today as they were then. By posing—and answering—the eternal question, “Why do things always go wrong?” Peter explores the incompetence that runs so rampant through our society, our workplace, and our world in an outrageously funny yet honest and eye-opening manner. With a new foreword by Robert I. Sutton, bestselling author of The No Asshole Rule, this twenty-first century edition of Peter’s classic is set to shake up the business world all over again.